Dienstag, 31. Januar 2012

Goldschmidt Conference: "Weathering of sediments - from natural processes to underground CO2 storage"

Please let me draw your attention once again to the session "Weathering of sediments - from natural processes to underground CO2 storage" (Theme 7: Evolutive and Integrative Earth Surface Processes - see also abstract below) at the 22nd Goldschmidt Conference in MONTRÉAL, June 24-29, 2012.

http://www.vmgoldschmidt.org/2012/index.htm 

The weathering of silicate minerals exposed on the continents is known to be the main natural sink of CO2 from the atmosphere. Detrital silicates derived from the physical denudation of the continents are also a major component of marine sediments and it has recently been shown that CO2-induced weathering is a common process in marine sediments. Nevertheless, their geochemical behaviour and reaction rates are poorly understood. The same weathering processes are the final and long-term trapping mechanisms for underground CO2 storage, one of the options to mitigate our anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Nevertheless, reaction rates at those high-CO2 conditions and the geochemical behaviour in the natural storage formation are difficult to predict and hence the risks and/or safety of the CCS technology difficult to assess.

Furthermore, only very limited data is available from natural analogues with high CO2 concentrations, e.g. volcanic/hydrothermal CO2 seeps. This session aims at bringing together experts for the naturally-occurring weathering processes and those involved in CCS projects in order to exchange know-how as well as identify knowledge gaps on both sides. In this context we would like to invite contributions presenting field work, experimental investigations as well as thermodynamic and transport-reaction modeling studies.
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